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Events
Recommitting to Transatlantic Trade: A Conversation with the Congressional TTIP Caucus Co-Chairs January 22, 2015 / Washington, DC

On Wednesday, January 21, 2015, the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF) hosted an on-the-record event with three of the four Co-Chairs of the Congressional TTIP Caucus: Congressman Bill Keating (D-MA), Congressman Richard Neal (D-MA), and Congressman Todd Young (R-IN).

Audio
Aftermath of the Paris Attacks: Issues of Integration and Inclusion in Europe January 20, 2015

GMF fellow Adnan Kifayat discusses inclusion issues in Europe with Mustafa Akyol and Peter Mandaville following the Paris terrorist attacks.

U.S. and EU Objectives in the Med – Mediterranean Strategy Group, Naples, 2014 January 12, 2015

Nathalie Tocci, Brian Katulis, Michael Köhler, and Ellen Laipson outline U.S. and European objectives in the Mediterranean.

 

Research & Analysis Archive

Global Swing States: Brazil, India, Indonesia, Turkey, and the Future of International Order November 27, 2012 / Daniel M. Kliman, Richard Fontaine


The rise of four powerful democracies – Brazil, India, Indonesia, and Turkey – presents one of the most significant opportunities for U.S. foreign policy in the early 21st century. Daniel M. Kliman of the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF) and Richard Fontaine of the Center for a New American Security (CNAS) urge U.S. leaders to pursue closer partnerships with these four countries, which they term “global swing states.” In this new report, released as part of a joint initiative of GMF and CNAS, Kliman and Fontaine offer a new framework for thinking about how U.S. engagement with these pivotal powers can bolster peace, prosperity, and freedom. The authors offer policy prescriptions specific to each of the four countries while recommending that the United States' engagement with the global swing states include four broad components:

  1. Capitalizing on areas where Brazil, India, Indonesia, and Turkey have already taken on new global responsibilities;
  2. Addressing some of the demands of the “global swing states” for greater representation in international institutions;
  3. Helping  the four countries strengthen their domestic capacity to more actively support the international order;
  4. Increasing the resources and attention that the U.S. government devotes to these nations to better match their rising strategic importance.