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Events
Young Strategist Forum 2014 April 18, 2014 / Tokyo, Japan

The third Young Strategists Forum (YSF) was held in Tokyo from January 31- Feb 4, 2014 in partnership with the Sasakawa Peace Foundation.

Keynote from South Caucasus: The Dividing Lines Are Shifting April 14, 2014

In a keynote address, S. Frederick Starr explains how the events in Crimea are representative of a larger Russian tactic of seeking out geopolitical vacuums and promoting them, only to be the actor that then fills that void. He characterizes this strategy as "filling vacuums", and claimed the West, and the United States in particular, should be prepared to fill these vacuums if they are serious of halting further progress of Russia's revanchist designs

China’s Efforts to Reduce Air Pollution March 14, 2014

Biz Asia America's Philip Yin is joined by Paul Bledsoe, President of Bledsoe & Associates to discuss how successful are China's efforts to shut down factories to reduce air pollution.

Look East, Act East: transatlantic agendas in the Asia Pacific December 18, 2012 / Peter Sparding, Andrew Small
EUISS


GMF Transatlantic Fellows, Peter Sparding and Andrew Small co-authored a chapter for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS) report called, Look East, Act East: transatlantic agendas in the Asia Pacific. In their chapter entitled, Towards a transatlantic relationship in the Asia Pacific, the GMF Fellows outline how the United States and Europe are increasingly focused on strengthening their economic relations in the Asia Pacific. As the emerging economies of the region start to generate a significant amount of global demand and foreign direct investment, especially from China, starts to flow to Europe and the United States, the Asia-Pacific has the potential to become a true growth generator for the ailing West.

 Asia’s rapidly growing middle class could signal a shift in the distribution of global demand and offer vast new opportunities for European and American businesses. The transatlantic partners therefore have a shared interest to ensure that – despite a natural level of transatlantic competition – individual strategies are mutually reinforcing in shaping the economic environment of the region. But transatlantic coordination – or even harmonization – of economic policy towards the Asia Pacific is currently inadequate.