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Cities Are Taking the Lead on Inequality October 23, 2014

Events
Global Security Dialogues on the Move from Dallas to Atlanta October 24, 2014 / Dallas, Texas

On October 21, GMF’s Global Security Dialogues launched with “Who is Backing Whom in the Middle East and Why?” in Dallas, Texas. Next is "Leading a Multinational Workforce: The NATO Experience in Afghanistan" in Atlanta, Georgia on November 18. Register now.

Audio
In 8 Minutes or Less: John Bellinger Discusses Transatlantic Counter-Terrorism Approaches October 17, 2014

Bruno Lete, GMF senior program officer for foreign and security policy, interviews John Bellinger III, partner at Arnold & Porter LLC in Washington DC, about transatlantic approaches to counter-terrorism. Bellinger is the former legal advisor to the U.S. Department of State and the National Security Council.

Audio
In 8 minutes or less: TTIP and the South Atlantic September 30, 2014

What impact will TTIP have on the South Atlantic?

Look East, Act East: transatlantic agendas in the Asia Pacific December 18, 2012 / Peter Sparding, Andrew Small
EUISS


GMF Transatlantic Fellows, Peter Sparding and Andrew Small co-authored a chapter for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS) report called, Look East, Act East: transatlantic agendas in the Asia Pacific. In their chapter entitled, Towards a transatlantic relationship in the Asia Pacific, the GMF Fellows outline how the United States and Europe are increasingly focused on strengthening their economic relations in the Asia Pacific. As the emerging economies of the region start to generate a significant amount of global demand and foreign direct investment, especially from China, starts to flow to Europe and the United States, the Asia-Pacific has the potential to become a true growth generator for the ailing West.

 Asia’s rapidly growing middle class could signal a shift in the distribution of global demand and offer vast new opportunities for European and American businesses. The transatlantic partners therefore have a shared interest to ensure that – despite a natural level of transatlantic competition – individual strategies are mutually reinforcing in shaping the economic environment of the region. But transatlantic coordination – or even harmonization – of economic policy towards the Asia Pacific is currently inadequate.