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Events
Half Past Obama: No Time To Come Home – A Pivot to Europe and an Extended Stay in the Middle East December 22, 2014 / Paris

Dr. Serfaty’s presentation was discussed by Dr. Alexandra de Hoop Scheffer, director of the Paris office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, and Dr. Jan Joel Andersson, Senior Analyst at the EUISS, and followed by an open debate with the audience.

Audio
Want, Waste or War? A Conversation About the Global Resource Nexus December 19, 2014

The 2011-2012 fellows of the Transatlantic Academy held a book launch on December 10 for Want, Waste or War? The Global Resource Nexus and the Struggle for Land, Energy, Food, Water and Minerals, based on the 2012 report of the Academy and published by Routledge in November.

A Transatlantic Talk with David McAllister December 09, 2014

On Tuesday, December 2, 2014, the GMF hosted David McAllister, member of European Parliament and chairman of the delegation for relations with the United States, for the fourth installment of its Transatlantic Talks to discuss the dynamics of EU-U.S.

Look East, Act East: transatlantic agendas in the Asia Pacific December 18, 2012 / Peter Sparding, Andrew Small
EUISS


GMF Transatlantic Fellows, Peter Sparding and Andrew Small co-authored a chapter for the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS) report called, Look East, Act East: transatlantic agendas in the Asia Pacific. In their chapter entitled, Towards a transatlantic relationship in the Asia Pacific, the GMF Fellows outline how the United States and Europe are increasingly focused on strengthening their economic relations in the Asia Pacific. As the emerging economies of the region start to generate a significant amount of global demand and foreign direct investment, especially from China, starts to flow to Europe and the United States, the Asia-Pacific has the potential to become a true growth generator for the ailing West.

 Asia’s rapidly growing middle class could signal a shift in the distribution of global demand and offer vast new opportunities for European and American businesses. The transatlantic partners therefore have a shared interest to ensure that – despite a natural level of transatlantic competition – individual strategies are mutually reinforcing in shaping the economic environment of the region. But transatlantic coordination – or even harmonization – of economic policy towards the Asia Pacific is currently inadequate.