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Events
The Changing Security Environment in the Levant November 19, 2014 / Brussels, Belgium

In an on-the-record conversation, Ambassador Benny Dagan and Dr. Ian O. Lesser will share their insights on the background of the current regional instability and consider the political, security, and sectarian dynamics fueling the Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq, the inherent contradictions within the U.S.-led coalition and the impact of Iran on recent developments.

Audio
In 8 Minutes or Less: Katherine Richardson Discusses Energy Security in Denmark November 20, 2014

GMF’s Sarah Halls met with Katherine Richardson, professor and leader of the Sustainability Science Centre at the University of Copenhagen to discuss energy security in Denmark.

Japan’s Democratic Alliances November 19, 2014

On July 17th, the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF) convened a day-long event examining Tokyo’s strategy to diversify its democratic partnerships beyond the continuing anchor of the U.S.-Japan alliance by forging closer relations with like-minded powers in the Indo-Pacific and Europe.

Mideast Protests Drive Up Oil, Threaten Recovery February 01, 2011 / Bruce Stokes
Fiscal Times


With oil prices soaring past $100 a barrel on Monday, thanks to growing uncertainty about stability in the Middle East, the somewhat distant, feel-good, democracy-awakening story coming out of Egypt suddenly took on a more ominous, economic tone that could hit Americans where it hurts most — their wallets.

The prospect of significantly higher costs for driving, heating and running factories raised the specter of an economic slowdown just as the U.S. economy has been showing signs of finally recovering from the Great Recession. Of even greater danger, rising energy prices threaten to sap growth in Europe, where recovery is shallower, but even more urgently needed as the euro zone struggles to contain a sovereign debt crisis. A new recession in Europe, the world’s largest economic area, would send the dollar higher, dooming President Obama’s goal of creating desperately needed jobs by doubling U.S. exports by 2015.

The immediate threat of runaway oil prices remains slim. Egypt is an insignificant player in world oil trade and global petroleum stocks appear adequate to weather a prolonged storm. They currently stand at 145 days of imports. The International Energy Agency in Paris thinks 90 days are needed for market stability.

But oil spot markets are notoriously volatile. The price of a barrel of Brent crude oil, the global benchmark, has risen 44 percent since August, beginning its assent long before the turmoil in Tunisia, Algeria and now Egypt, driven by expectations of rising demand as the world economy improves.

For full article, please visit the Fiscal Times