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Cities Are Taking the Lead on Inequality October 23, 2014

Events
Global Security Dialogues on the Move from Dallas to Atlanta October 24, 2014 / Dallas, Texas

On October 21, GMF’s Global Security Dialogues launched with “Who is Backing Whom in the Middle East and Why?” in Dallas, Texas. Next is "Leading a Multinational Workforce: The NATO Experience in Afghanistan" in Atlanta, Georgia on November 18. Register now.

Audio
In 8 Minutes or Less: John Bellinger Discusses Transatlantic Counter-Terrorism Approaches October 17, 2014

Bruno Lete, GMF senior program officer for foreign and security policy, interviews John Bellinger III, partner at Arnold & Porter LLC in Washington DC, about transatlantic approaches to counter-terrorism. Bellinger is the former legal advisor to the U.S. Department of State and the National Security Council.

Audio
In 8 minutes or less: TTIP and the South Atlantic September 30, 2014

What impact will TTIP have on the South Atlantic?

Mon Dieu! French Banks Could Pull Down the Economy August 12, 2011 / Bruce Stokes


Concern that France’s AAA bond rating might be downgraded began to abate Thursday, after French President Nicolas Sarkozy rushed back from the French Riviera for an emergency cabinet meeting and the European Central Bank provided overnight lending. The action gave a needed jolt to U.S. markets, with Dow regaining most of yesterday's losses, closing up 423 points.

But Paris is not out of the woods yet in escaping the same kind of Standard & Poor’s downgrade that sent the U.S. economy reeling. The country’s debt trajectory may not be sustainable. And the underlying well-being of the French financial system remains highly suspect.

None of this is new, of course. In April, before she became managing director of the International Monetary Fund, Christine LaGarde, then minister of economic affairs in the French government, told The Fiscal Times, “I am told they [French banks] are safe.” Hardly a ringing endorsement. Such doubt sows fears that threats to the financial health of banks could reemerge at any time.

France is not Italy in terms of debt or the probability of default. France’s debt to GDP ratio is expected to be 87% in 2012, while Italy’s ratio will be 119%. Nevertheless, as measured by the cost of insuring against a default, -- the likelihood of Paris getting in trouble has doubled in just the last year.

Read the full article here.