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Cities Are Taking the Lead on Inequality October 23, 2014

Events
Global Security Dialogues on the Move from Dallas to Atlanta October 24, 2014 / Dallas, Texas

On October 21, GMF’s Global Security Dialogues launched with “Who is Backing Whom in the Middle East and Why?” in Dallas, Texas. Next is "Leading a Multinational Workforce: The NATO Experience in Afghanistan" in Atlanta, Georgia on November 18. Register now.

Audio
In 8 Minutes or Less: John Bellinger Discusses Transatlantic Counter-Terrorism Approaches October 17, 2014

Bruno Lete, GMF senior program officer for foreign and security policy, interviews John Bellinger III, partner at Arnold & Porter LLC in Washington DC, about transatlantic approaches to counter-terrorism. Bellinger is the former legal advisor to the U.S. Department of State and the National Security Council.

Audio
In 8 minutes or less: TTIP and the South Atlantic September 30, 2014

What impact will TTIP have on the South Atlantic?

Research & Analysis Archive

The Democratic Disconnect: Citizenship and Accountability in the Transatlantic Community May 02, 2013 / Seyla Benhabib, David Cameron, Anna Dolidze, Gábor Halmai, Gunther Hellmann, Kateryna Pishchikova, Richard Youngs


This report revisits the paradigms of liberalism and democracy, and questions the ways in which liberal and democratic values are expressed domestically and promoted The authors examine the dynamics of democracy, and the forces and mechanisms that derail or obstruct democratic development, or, alternatively, foster democratic sustainability at the national and international levels. The atrophy observed today in more or less established democracies forces us to revisit the question of how core liberal democratic features can be enhanced. The authors reject the argument that these challenges are merely fleeting or shallow, or that they are simply an ongoing part of democracy’s normal travails. They are new, and they have created novel circumstances that liberal democracies must confront. The focus of the paper lies in the messy and ever-changing world of contemporary liberal democracies in the transatlantic realm as well as on the phenomena of hybrid regimes and democratic regressions.

The core argument is that serious problems co-exist with greater potential for re-energizing democracy across the transatlantic area. The juncture is one of both threat and possibility. The key to developing the positive potential lies in enhancing the participatory vibrancy that represents the cornerstone of high quality democracy. The authors offer ideas for how the dynamics of participation and representation can be better connected. The way forward for democracy is unlikely to be smooth and will undoubtedly be subject to sobering constraints and disappointing setbacks. Yet, the faint stirrings of democratic renewal can be detected. With sufficiently innovative reimagining, democracy’s future may not be as bleak as many prophesy.