GMF - The German Marshall Fund of the United States - Strengthening Transatlantic Cooperation

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Events
Inclusive Leadership Programs: Advancing Disability Rights in the Transatlantic Context April 15, 2014 / Washington, D.C.

Most recently on April 8, the German Marshall Fund hosted a leadership, diversity and inclusion best practices exchange titled “The Digital Frontier: Widening Access for People with Disability” to share innovative, inclusive leadership strategies across the Atlantic.

Keynote from South Caucasus: The Dividing Lines Are Shifting April 14, 2014

In a keynote address, S. Frederick Starr explains how the events in Crimea are representative of a larger Russian tactic of seeking out geopolitical vacuums and promoting them, only to be the actor that then fills that void. He characterizes this strategy as "filling vacuums", and claimed the West, and the United States in particular, should be prepared to fill these vacuums if they are serious of halting further progress of Russia's revanchist designs

China’s Efforts to Reduce Air Pollution March 14, 2014

Biz Asia America's Philip Yin is joined by Paul Bledsoe, President of Bledsoe & Associates to discuss how successful are China's efforts to shut down factories to reduce air pollution.

Events

U.S. Under Secretary Of State Speaks at Global Swing States Report Launch November 27, 2012 / Washington DC


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The German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF) and the Center for a New American Security (CNAS) jointly organized a launch event for the release of a new report, Global Swing States: Brazil, India, Indonesia, Turkey and the Future of International Order. Held on November 27, the event featured Under Secretary of State Robert D. Hormats and GMF Transatlantic Fellow Jennifer Hillman as well as the report authors Dr. Daniel M. Kliman of GMF and Richard Fontaine of CNAS.  Ted Piccone, Senior Fellow and Deputy Director for Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution, served as moderator.

The event began with a short presentation of the report. Fontaine explained why Brazil, India, Indonesia, and Turkey are global swing states and why this concept offers a new framework for thinking about these four powers. Kliman outlined the report’s main recommendations for U.S. engagement and framed the pursuit of closer ties with these rising democracies as the best path forward in a world of uncertainty. In his remarks, Secretary Hormats underscored the critical influence of global swing states on the future shape of the world economy. Hillman unpacked some of the challenges the four pose to the world trade order.

 The discussion among the panelists included questions about the selection of the four as global swing states, how U.S. engagement of these rising democracies relates to the rise of China, and whether these pivotal powers will fully uphold the human rights order. Questions from the audience included how to ensure a sustained U.S. focus on global swings states and what role the private sector should play in America’s engagement strategy.