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Bruce Stokes is the executive director of the Transatlantic Task Force: Together or Alone? Choices and Strategies for Transatlantic Relations for 2021 and Beyond. Previously, he was the director of Global Economic Attitudes at the Pew Research Center in Washington, DC, and is a former international economics columnist for the National Journal, a Washington-based public policy magazine. He is also a former senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

From 2010-2012 Stokes was a senior fellow at the German Marshall Fund. He was the author of the 2009 Transatlantic Trends survey,  and two task force reports: The Case for Renewing Transatlantic Capitalism, and A New Era for Transatlantic Trade Leadership.

In 1987 and again in 1989, Stokes was a Japan Society Fellow, living in and reporting from Japan. In 1997, he was a member of President Clinton's Commission on United States-Pacific Trade and Investment Policy and he wrote its final report, "Building American Prosperity in the 21st Century."

He is co-author of the book America Against the World: How We Are Different and Why We Are Disliked (Times Books, 2006), and co-author of numerous Pew Global Attitudes Surveys.

In 2006, Stokes was honored by the Coalition of Service Industries for his reporting on services issues. In 2004, he was chosen by International Economy magazine as one of the most influential China watchers in the U.S. press. In 1995, he was picked by Washingtonian Magazine as one of the "Best on Business" reporters in Washington. In 1989, Stokes won the coveted John Hancock award for excellence in business and economics reporting for his series on the impact of the rising yen on the Japanese economy.

Stokes is a graduate of the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, the School for Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and attended the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University.

Media Mentions

History has demonstrated that people have already made up their minds when things happen too close to the election. But the midterm elections are far enough away that the public opinion benefits of this legislation may have some time to settle in.
Everyone I have talked to is wary about what is likely to happen in the next few months, with high energy prices, the trajectories of the various economies, and whether the public will become less supportive of the strong stance that we've jointly taken on Russia and the war in Ukraine.