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Martin Quencez currently serves as the deputy director of GMF’s Paris office and a research fellow in the Security & Defense program. His work includes research on transatlantic security and defense cooperation and U.S. and French foreign policy, on which he regularly writes articles for the French and international press.

He leads different research projects on European defense cooperation and transatlantic defense innovation. He is also an associate researcher for the European Council on Foreign Relations, working in France for its European Powers program. He taught transatlantic relations at the Euro-American campus of Sciences-Po. Prior to joining GMF, he worked for the Institute of Defense Studies and Analyses in New Delhi, where he focused on French and Indian strategic thinking. He studied international relations at the Uppsala University in Sweden and is a graduate of Sciences-Po Paris. He is currently doing a PhD in contemporary history at the Sorbonne Nouvelle University.

Media Mentions

It was an impossible mission. It was necessary to include a certain number of countries that do not represent democratic values, either because they are important allies in the framework of NATO or other American partnerships in the world, or because there was no question of isolating potentially important countries in the competition with China.
Translated from French